Ancestry to stop selling Family Tree Maker software end of this month!

 

Today I received an email from Ancestry stating the following

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Dear Family Tree Maker™ community,

Ancestry is proud to have made a significant investment this year to bring valuable new content and records to the Ancestry site. In 2015, we’ve made 220 million searchable historical records from Mexico available, more than 170 million pages from the largest collection of U.S. will and probate records, among others. We’ve also introduced new features such as Ancestry Academy, and major advancements for AncestryDNA.

As we strive to provide our customers with the best experience possible, we are constantly evaluating our services and product offerings. True to this focus, we’ve taken a hard look at the declining desktop software market and the impact this has on being able to continue to provide new content, product enhancements and support that our users need. With that, we’ve made the tough decision to stop selling Family Tree Maker as of December 31, 2015.

We will continue to support existing Family Tree Maker owners at least through January 1, 2017. During this time, all features of the software, including TreeSync™ will continue to work. Our Member Services team will also remain available to assist with questions or issues you may have.

These changes are never easy. But by focusing our efforts, we can concentrate on continuing to build great products for our loyal Ancestry community.

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Looking at the reaction on their blog this has not been well received. Personally I have been using Family Tree Maker since around 1999 if not before. I use the software so I have a copy of all my work on the computer rather than on Ancestry’s website only.  It also produces some very good reports which can easily be shared with the family either in printed form or as a pdf for emailing.

Working on a MAC computer at home there is limited choice with regards to genealogy software and of course I am not too keen to start learning a new product but I will if forced.

Maybe Ancestry should stop offering 6 months free membership subscription on the Family Tree Maker products then it would be more profitable.  Sadly rather than being passionate about genealogy they are passionate about profit. Very disappointed and I will certainly be reconsidering my subscription when it comes to renewal.

The story behind a photo

What stories are evoked by your photos. What memories do they hold? Have your shared your thoughts and memories so future generations know the ‘whole’ picture?

For the onlooker the photo below is just a photo of me and my sister but for me it reminds me of so much more.

me sis and cameraA. How my Mum, despite our 6 year age difference, would occasionally make the same clothes for me and my sister and make us wear them! I don’t remember feeling upset by this, it was just a fact of life.

B. How long they had to last (getting a tad short).

C. How clumsy I used to be. Originally I thought the bandage on my leg was a result of falling over on holiday. But digging back into my memory I now think it is when I spiked the back of my knee trying to climb over the school railings. This escapade resulted in a trip to hospital and three stitches. Surprisingly there was no blood as I walked home – still don’t understand that. I was told at the hospital it was very close to causing real problems. Clearly remember the nurse not being very nice and my Dad having to hold my leg as she stitched, as she didn’t use an anaesthetic (probably to teach me a lesson). This incident isn’t mentioned in my medical notes (yes I have viewed them – apply in writing to your GP – approx cost £10) but in retrospect it’s a very big bandage for a fall.

D. How I liked cameras and photography – who knew I would do it as a job for a while.

E. A lovely family holiday at a farm in Yeovil. Particularly remember the 5 sons who worked the farm – sadly I was a tad too young to attract their interest. IMG_6792This photo brings back memories of

A. Dressing up and playing being a cowgirl.

B. Having a cap gun and thinking the smell and noise it gave off when fired was wonderful.

C. Being allowed to play outside our house after being ill. Told in no uncertain terms – do not go down the street – STAY OUTSIDE THE HOUSE. But I had a new cap gun and wanted to show my friends. Boy was I in trouble for disobeying my Mum  (not for the first or last time).  I suspect I was recovering from chicken pox and probably still contagious!

D. Going to the cinema on a Saturday morning with loads and loads of other kids and watching the old Wild West movies at Evington Road Cinema, Leicester.

cinema

Railway workers who died in WW1

Picture1

Do you have a railway worker ancestor? By visiting the National Railway Museum website you may be able to obtain information on your ancestor. Their list of fallen soldiers includes name, rank, railway company and department, railway occupation, and other information.

My husbands ancestor – John William Whitfield (15.6.1891 – 9.10.1917) from Linton, North Yorkshire worked as a plate layer before the war and is mentioned in the list. The information has been compiled from the service book used at St Paul’s Cathedral together with archives and Common Wealth War Graves Commission information.

The service was held at St Paul’s Cathedral on Wednesday 14th May 1919 at 2.30pm.

In Memory of the Railwaymen of Great Britain and Ireland who Have Died

in the Service of Their Country During the War, 1914-1918

The information can be downloaded as an excel document or a pdf.

http://www.nrm.org.uk/RailwayStories/worldwarone.aspx